Drought Resilient Soils and Landscapes Grants Program

What is the Drought Resilient Soils and Landscapes Grants Program?

The Drought Resilient Soils and Landscapes Grants Program is a grant opportunity to trial and demonstrate how scaling of particular practices (or combinations of practices) to improve management of natural capital can build drought resilience.

 

Background

The Future Drought Fund: Drought Resilient Soils and Landscapes Grants Program aims to create and communicate an evidence base and case studies that contribute to scaling out the successful practices.

The Drought Resilient Soils and Landscapes Grants Program is  looking for projects that address all of the following:

  • targeted at improving the drought resilience of agriculture
  • involve trial and demonstration of practices to improve management of natural capital in ways that directly support drought resilience
  • focused on achieving and measuring impacts at scale, particularly landscape scale
  • provide case studies to support scaling out of successful practices through robust monitoring, measurement and communication of project impacts
  • are valued between $500,000 and $1 million
  • delivered over April 2022 to June 2024.

 

Funding

The Australian Government has announced a total of $23 million (GST exclusive) over 3 years for the Future Drought Fund: Drought Resilient Soils and Landscapes Grants Program.

The minimum grant amount is $500,000 (GST exclusive) and the maximum grant amount is $1 million (GST exclusive).

Co-investment is expected, but not mandated. It will be assessed as part of considering value for money (that is, the impacts that can be achieved from the allocation of a given amount of public funds).

 

Eligible Projects

To be eligible your project must:

  • be consistent with the parameters for the program outlines in section 2.3 of the guidelines notably:
    • targeted at improving the drought resilience of soils and landscapes
    • involve trial and demonstration of practices to improve management of natural capital
    • focused on achieving and measuring impacts at landscape scale
    • provide “case studies” to support “scaling out” of successful practices through robust monitoring, measurement and communication of project impacts
    • involve relatively mature practices, rather than basic research and early-stage innovation.
  • take place in an agricultural landscape within Australia. An agricultural landscape is a region in which agriculture is the predominant form of land use. This can include aquaculture, agroforestry and management of areas not under productive use where the ecosystem services of such areas support agricultural productivity and profitability. It does not include farm forestry or commercial fisheries.

Examples of eligible practices include:

  • management of groundcover through alternative grazing and/or cropping approaches
    • practices include (but not limited to) rotational grazing, no-till cropping, pasture cropping and sustainable intensification
    • Other cropping and grazing practices that are known to increase biomass, improve soil health, and build soil carbon specifically in low rainfall environments
  • experimenting with drought-resilient livestock, pastures and crops in new bioregions (or parts of bioregions)
  • experimenting with switching from pasture to drought resilient shrub forage systems
  • using soil moisture management approaches at seeding on a range of soil types
  • diversification into alternative livestock, pasture or crop species
  • holistic, integrated pest and weed management practices, to avoid competition with pasture/crops
  • innovative approaches to monitor and manage pasture biomass
  • enhancement of biodiversity on farm, by planting shelterbelts and biodiversity blocks, revegetating gullies and other erosion-prone areas, or protecting remnant trees. This contributes to the general resilience of both agricultural and broader landscapes. For example, improving the resilience of diverse bird species to drought and other climatic shocks feeds back into improved resilience of the land itself.
  • management of farm dams and riparian areas, both for stock water and biodiversity purposes, for example through landscape rehydration, farm dam rehabilitation, water spreading and ponding, and similar approaches.
  • trialling management tools to control total grazing pressure, including by non-domestic herbivores
  • monitoring, modelling and scientific assessment of the impacts of the practices being trialled and demonstrated on natural capital and drought resilience.
  • development of communications materials that capture project data and information to support understanding and “scaling out” by others.

 

Eligible Applicants

To be eligible you must be an Australian-based organisation, capable of entering into a legally binding and enforceable agreement with the Commonwealth. This includes the following entity types:

  • Indigenous Corporation, registered under the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act 2006 (Cth)
  • Company
  • Corporate Commonwealth Entity
  • Commonwealth Company
  • Corporate State or Territory Entity
  • Non-corporate State or Territory Statutory Authority
  • Local Government
  • Cooperative
  • Incorporated Association
  • Statutory Entity
  • Partnership
  • Trustee on behalf of a Trust

Consortia are encouraged to apply. Each consortium must nominate a lead applicant who is solely accountable to the Commonwealth for the delivery of grant activities and is an eligible entity as per the list above. Eligible entities can form a consortium with ineligible entities. Projects that involve collaboration among people and organisations across a landscape will be viewed favourably, as collaboration is a driver of resilience. All consortia members must comply with the National Redress
legislation. Given the program’s objectives and focus, a person or sole trader will not be eligible to lead but can be part of a consortium.

Organisations can make, and/or be part of, more than one application. However, each individual application will be assessed on its own merits – there will be no collective consideration of applications.

You must meet the following additional eligibility requirements before you apply:

  • have an Australian Business Number (ABN)
  • have an account with an Australian financial institution

If you do not meet these additional requirements, you will not be eligible.

 

Timing

Applications close 11 January 2022.

 

More Information

What is the #1 grant for start-ups?

12,000+ companies access the R&D tax incentive per year that yields a CASH REBATE of up to 43.5%.
This might be perfect your start up.
Do you want to know more?

Scroll to Top
R&D Top 10 Consultant Tips

Top 10 Consultant Tips to Maximise the R&D Tax Incentive